Monday, July 21, 2014

7.21.14 Tennessee Civil War Notes

        21, Formation of a military sewing society promoted

Ladies of Memphis, Please Attend! You are requested to meet in the basement of Calvery [sic] church, corner of Second and Adams, on Monday next, to form a Military Sewing Society. There is work to be done for the volunteers, and this announcement is sufficient to bring the patriotic ladies of Memphis together, for they certainly will not consent to let the soldiers pay for having their uniforms made, while there are so many willing hands and hearts waiting for some opportunity, like this, to work for those who are doing so much in their defense. The first work to be done by the society is for the Southern Guards. Those having friends in that company, whose suits they wish to make, can get them if they apply soon enough, at Calvary church. Further solicitation is unnecessary. 

Memphis Daily Appeal, July 21, 1861.

 

 

        21, "Pickets Captured—Railroad Bridges Burned—Great Excitement."

Six of our pickets, who were stationed on the Lebanon road were attacked yesterday afternoon by a party of twenty guerrillas belonging to Forrest's troop, and all but one captured; one of these subsequently escaped. We learn that the pickets were strolling in an orchard at the time.

Later in the afternoon three bridges on the Chattanooga Railroad were burned down, the nearest seven and the furthest eight miles from the city. Scouts report Col. Forrest with a force of from twelve hundred to two thousand within five miles of this lace. At the time of writing this paragraph the troops are under arms, prepared for an attack, and much excitement exists.

Nashville Daily Union, July 22, 1862.

        21, L&N Railroad cut by Confederates between Murfreesboro and Nashville

HDQRS., Huntsville, July 22, 1862.

Gen. McCOOK, Battle Creek:

….Railroad between Nashville and Murfreesborough cut yesterday, will take eight days to repair it….

D. C. BUELL.

OR, Ser. I, Vol. 16, pt. II, p. 197.

 

 

        21, The Gangs of Memphis

"Riot Among the Boys"

It seems that the New York [draft] riots have set everybody crazy on the riot question -- even the boys are not getting along well unless they can get up a riot on their own account. Yesterday, therefore, they undertook the game out in the neighborhood of Chelsea.[1] Some boys from the locality known as Scotland, gathered together, and marched into Chelsean territory. This invasion roused all the wrathful fires of pride of place in the bosoms of the Chelsea boys. A call for organization was made. The boys of the invaded territory flew to arms; clubs, stones and brickbats were their principal weapons. The number, though small at first, rapidly increased until each side numbered about fifty. A regular pitched battle was fought, in which the Chelsea boys, aided by reinforcements from Pinch were victorious, the invaders being forced to evacuate. The boys composing these bands were of all ages, ranging from six to twenty years. Some ten or fifteen the boys were more or less injured by being stuck with clubs, stone, and such like missiles. Some soldiers who had watched the fight interposed, and restored quiet among the rowdies.

Memphis Bulletin, July 21, 1863.

        21, "Murder, Robbery, Cutting and Maiming;" the return of a crime wave and a call for the return of a military police force in Civil War Nashville

Many of our readers will remember the fearful state in which Nashville was for two or three months previous to the first of last January; almost everyday we were called upon to record some brutal murder, a burglary, a robbery, or assaults. Earnestly and repeatedly we called upon the authorities for reform, and suggested a plan by which we hoped to restore law and order, and protect the lives and property of our fellow citizens. This plan was finally approved by Gen. Rosecrans, who caused a military force to be placed in command of the mayor, with the view of aiding the police in the preservation of good order, and the prevention of crime[2]. We need scarcely say that our citizens were rejoiced at the manner in which Lieut. Isom's detachment performed their arduous duties; after two days and nights of constant vigilance, some of the most notorious characters were either in jail or had absconded, and so close a watch was kept upon the others that many found it convenient to leave the city soon thereafter. Citizens could walk the streets at any hour of the night without fear, and the horrible atrocities were nearly forgotten, when Lieut. Isom was called to another field of operations, and his men were ordered to other duties, thus leaving the city again at the mercy of the depraved -- citizens and soldiers.

Again our city is disgraced by scenes of barbarous atrocities and almost nightly robberies. Soldiers are permitted to roam about the city off duty, armed, and after imbibing a few glasses of whisky, ready and willing to use their weapons upon the slightest provocation. Within a few days we have recorded the killing of Jeremiah Walsh, an inoffensive citizen-an act, to say the least of it, unwarranted: the poisoning of a family of nine persons; the cutting of a soldier by a comrade in so horrible a manner that he died in a few hours thereafter; the killing of sutler by a negro [sic]; and on Sunday night [19th], the cutting of a citizen with a sabre or sword bayonet, in such a manner that it is almost miraculous how the man could possibly survive.

The atrocities are increasing daily, and hence the necessity of immediate action to check the progress of crime in our midst. We respectfully suggest a conference between the military and civil authorities, for the purpose of deriving some means of preserving order. South Nashville, especially, needs immediate attention. We were informed by one of the watchmen of that district last week that in one night, between the hours of 10 and 3 o'clock, he heard more than a dozen shots fired, and one of the city marshals informed us that no citizen considered himself safe outside his house after dark. The Western part of the city also needs especial attention and for reasons which Marshal Chumbly can point out.

If no better plan can be adopted than that we originally proposed, we respectfully urge upon the authorities its revival; it is simply to detail a sufficient number of the Provost Guard, to allow two men to accompany each Policemen on his beat, and parade it together every night -- the whole to be under the command of the Mayor, and subject to his order, night and day.

Nashville Dispatch, July 21, 1863.

 

 

        21, "The Tennessee Banks."

We have understood that the Supervisor of Banks will enter upon the discharge of his duties under the Bank Code during the present or coming week and that it is his intention to exact as faithful a compliance with provisions of the Bank

Code and the acts amendatory thereof as circumstances will at present justify. We feel warranted in saying that one object he will labor to accomplish will be to bring up the notes of the banks doing business in the State to the "greenback" standard. He regards it a duty he owes to the people of Tennessee, who hold largely the issues of our banks, to require the banks to make their issues as good as that which the Government has made legal tender.

Another matter that will engage the especial attention of the Supervisor of Banks will be the looking after and gathering up of such of the assets of the Bank of Tennessee as may be within reach. There is a large amount of debts due the Bank scattered over the State much of which, by proper attention, may be secured. The evidences of these debts have been carried beyond the limits of the State; but where it can be ascertained that a party owes the Bank, the laws of Tennessee provide amply for enforcing its collection. The Bank holds a very considerable amount of real estate in various parts of the State, which he proposed to take possession of. The greater portion of this real estate is improved and very valuable, and may be disposed of upon very advantageous terms. From these tow items a fund may be realized which will go a long way toward liquidating the indebtedness of the State.

Nashville Dispatch, July 21, 1864.



[1] Chelsea was the Irish section of Memphis in the 19th century.

[2] This sounds similar to actions taken by W. T. Sherman in Memphis in the summer of 1862. There seems to be no record of Rosecrans actions on this particular point.


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX

 

Sunday, July 20, 2014

7.20.14 Tennessee Civil War Notes

        20, Federals initiate counter attack on guerrilla uprising on Obion and Hatchie Rivers

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Trenton, Tenn., July 20, 1862.

Capt. M. ROCHESTER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Columbus, Ky.:

There appears to be a general uprising among the guerrillas along the Obion and Hatchie Rivers. The force that threatened Humboldt has been driven south toward Gordonsville, and Brig.-Gen. Logan has sent his forces after them. The force at Key Corners I have sent five companies of cavalry after, and the force 15 miles west of Troy I have sent three companies of cavalry after. None of the bands had rendezvoused over twenty-four hours before I was aware of their movements, and I immediately sent out my cavalry from all points with instructions to attack, no matter where found or in what force, knowing that quick movements and bold attacks is the most efficient method of breaking them up.

I informed Gen. Logan of the position of those south of us and ordered Col. Bryant to march on them. They fled the moment Col. Bryant moved, to escape Gen. Logan's forces. They report that band as a portion of Jackson's cavalry.

I telegraphed in relation to horseshoes. It is almost impossible for me to get along without them.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Brig.-Gen.

OR, Ser. I, Vol. 17, pt. II, p. 107.

        20, Federal forces take the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis

On last Sunday [the 20th] the military authorities took possession of, and held divine services in the Second Presbyterian Church....We understand they ensconced themselves in genuine military style; marching in amid strains of martial music, and 're-occupying' the unresisting pews; the musical department 'retaking' the choir gallery, and the preacher 'repossessing' the pulpit. After these recoveries, a hymn being adapted to a 'national tune,' was performed to the immense satisfaction of the Unions savers. The reverend Yankee divine, we learn, read a profound essay on good manners to his soldier auditors, upon two-thirds of whom our informant tells us, it produced a peculiarly soporific effect, which was only dispelled by the sounding of fife and pealing drum at the close of the services. None of our substantial [Confederate] citizens were present on this interesting occasion, and the respectable number of five forlorn, cadaverous looking females, evidently of the lower classes represented the Union feeling of the other sex!

Memphis Appeal, July 25, 1862.

 

 

20, "Don't Want Them."

It is extensively hoped in Nashville that the reported countermanding of the order by which the ill famed women of the town were deported, is without foundation. Without desiring to impose such a burden upon any other community, we would prefer that those women remain as far away as possible. Send them to Great Salt Lake city; they'd make admirable latter day saints, and old Brigham would shout gloriously at their conversion. It will require the largest fraction of a century to cure the evils they have inflicted on this community, and it can never be done if they are permitted to come back.

Nashville Daily Press, July 20, 1863.

        20, Letter of thanks from a convalescent Confederate soldier in Chattanooga, W. H. Warren, to Mrs. Robert M. Hooke

Chattanooga, Tenn.

July 20, 1863

Mrs. Hooke:

Allow me to return my most grateful acknowledgements [sic] for the very excellent and delicious Dinner [sic] you sent me. It makes the heart truly glad while we are separated from home and friends to be thus kindly remembered.

If while writing this acknowledgement [sic] I fail to impress you with a sufficient appreciation of the very nice compliment, you may be assured in my heart I am truly thankful, and shall only await an opportunity to full appreciation.

Very truly your friend,

W. H. Warren

W. P. A. Civil War Records, Vol. 2, p. 101.

 

 

20, U. S. Secretary of State William H. Seward modifies Major-General C. C. Washburn's General Orders, No. 23[1], relative to foreigners serving in the Memphis militia

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 20, 1864--3 p. m. (Received 22d.)

Maj.-Gen. WASHBURN, Memphis:

The following note has just been received by this Department from the Secretary of State. He says that foreigners refusing to perform military duty on the ground of alienage [sic] may be required to depart from your command, but cannot properly be subjected to arrest and punishment, the option being with them to stay and perform duty or to leave the country: DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, July 20, 1864.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I suggest that General Orders, No. 23, issued by Maj.-Gen. Washburn, be modified, so that foreigners claiming exemption from the Memphis militia by reason of alienage [sic], instead of being arrested and punished, may be notified to leave the city of Memphis and the military district under command of Gen. Washburn within twenty-four hours after such notice is served-not to return within said command until the said order, as amended, is revoked or modified, or until further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

The modification of your order suggested by the Secretary of State will probably serve your purpose, and you will please, therefore, conform to his suggestion, in order to avoid difficulties with foreign governments. Please acknowledge the receipt of this instruction, and forward a copy of your modified order.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

OR, Ser. I, Vol. 39, pt. II, p. 184.

 



[1] There is no copy of this order in the OR.


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014

7.19.14 Tennessee Civil War Notes


 19, On the Memphis Vigilance Committee

A young man who has reached Cairo, after a perilous flight from Memphis, where4 he was imprisoned, and daily expected to hung for the crime of being a Northerner, tells the following among other incidents:-

"About one week after his confinement, the recorder of the city, I. M. Dickenson, sent for him, for the purpose, as he stated, 'of expressing his profound regret that it was not in his power to hang him' and from his seat in court he denounced him as 'a damned abolitionist, who should not be allowed to live an hour. Had I the power,' said the learned jurist, 'I would cut your ears off, and nail you to the door of my court-room, and probably I shall have the pleasure yet.' This is the man who has just been elected Justice of the fifth civil district of Memphis, one of the most important offices in the city."

He describes some of the outrages inflicted on Unionist in the following words:

"These indignities were of daily occurrences, and to some they went further, and indulged every species of cruelty-shaving the head and whipping being regarded as a slight punishment by any one who desired to remove North. Nor is this all. In more than fifty instances, during my confinement, men were taken before the Vigilance Committee, and no one knows what became of them. They never came from that building alive; and there are now more than that number confined there, of whom their friends will never hear again. Their acts are all secret, and there is no concern for the men charged with being tinctured with abolitionism, so that no one cares; and thus they go on in their wholesale murdering with impunity."

The Liberator, July 19, 1861. [1]

         19, Gratitude and praise for the Southern Mothers

To the Ladies of the Society of Southern Mothers:

Allow me to return to you my heartfelt thanks for your kind and unremitting attentions to the unfortunate men under my charge, who have been confined to your rooms by sickness, several of whom were snatched as it were from the very jaws of death, by their opportune arrival in this city, when another day in camp would, in all probability, have placed them beyond the reach of medicine or kind treatment; and I can assure you, now that they are about to depart, that they will ever remember your kindness; and although they may never see you again, nor be able to return to you or yours the compensation their grateful hearts would willingly offer, the moral influences will still be impressed upon them, and they will extend to such other unfortunates as may come in their way, the same kindnesses that they received from you. And thus, fair ladies, the germ planted and nourished by the Southern Mothers will grow into a vigorous plant, its branches reaching into the remotest parts of our beloved South, and thousand who never knew you will feel the blessings of this great work of charity, and the merited prayers of its many recipients will ascend to heaven and there be registered to the credit of you and yours for all time. I would also return to Dr. G. W. Curry the sincere thanks of all the soldiers in my charge for his kindness, and I congratulate you in being so fortunate in securing the services of one so thoroughly versed in medical science, and so well adapted to the difficult position he how holds.

Respectfully,

G. A. Hanson, 1st regiment Arkansas volunteers,

Col. Claiborne commanding, C. S. A.

Memphis Daily Appeal, July 19, 1861.

 

 

19, "Bless God – the Star Spangled Banner now waves over this rebellious town!" The letter of Surgeon William M. Eames to his wife in Ohio

Union Coll. Hospital

July 19, 1862

Dearest Mary,

Bless God – the Star Spangled Banner now waves over this rebellious town! and as I awoke this morning it seemed as tho, everything was bright and beautiful instead of dark & uncertain – as it has been every morning before this week.

Yesterday Gen. Nelson came into town with a Brigade & part of a battery, and I started down town on horseback – (for the first time in a week to see the old flag & our [sic] soldiers. I could hardly keep back the tears – when I first met them & felt that I was now among friends & safe. [sic] Every day before he had been annoyed and insulted more or less by soldiers & citizens who would come in with their guns & demand something or try to steal something. Was very much afraid they would get old Jim[2] - but by keeping him shut up close all the time – they did not find him but once. Then three of the scamps rode into the yard with their long rifles & rode directly to the stable & in a few minutes they had the poor horse out leading him away. Dr. French volunteered to go & talk with them (as I was nearly sick.) & he succeeded in getting him back & now I defy the whole race of such vagabonds. Many of the citizens are looking to me to protect them against the evils they see – in the coming of Gen. Nelson & I would gladly do it – but unfortunately I have but little influence with him. I am heartily glad he has come, for it is [sic] a nest of traitors as he said to me yesterday - & he can handle such fellows just right. If he stays here I think the citizens of Murfreesboro will wish they had Capt. Rounds & the cowards Lester back again. By the way both these worthies were obliged to foot it all the way to Woodbury & Capt. Rounds feet were very sore indeed & he was obliged to keep up at a double quick. [sic] He must have suffered severely for his efforts to please secessionists of this town. Col. Lester might have rode but did not get him a horse as they told him to do & when they came to start all the rest of the officers were mounted but he was on foot. He asked for a horse & they (the secesh told him it was too late - he might have got one when the rest die – but had to walk.) He is a most precious coward to surrender a whole Reg & Battery – with only 2 men killed and the enemy defeated as they acknowledged. They said repeatedly to our men that they should not have attacked them again. They could not get their men to face the cannon & were on the point of leaving. They had sent out all their prisoners & plunder etc. but concluded to try a little threatening & so the Rebel General write a not to Col. Lester telling him that if he did not surrender he would cut his Reg all to pieces & show him no quarter, & the infernal cowardly poltroon surrendered. We all feel the burning disgrace & humiliation.

Gen. Nelson asked Dr. Smith how many men we lost & he told him 23 & said with a big oath, "& you give up to the rebels after losing only 23."

I hope Lester will be tried by court martial for cowardice. His whole Reg will testify against him. The rebels must have burned 30,000 worth of U. S. property & carried off as much more. They begun [sic] to think that they had finished up the war & ruined Uncle Sam, so that he dare not come back to Murfreesboro at all, but they now find he is here & in a much worse fume than before Gen. N. has got hold of thousands of dollars worth of rebel citizens['] property already. Old Doct. January came up & wanted to get me to assist him in getting his nigger [sic] back & Dr. Basket wanted me to get his horse & buggy away etc. I don't pity them at all. I presume there will be another hunt for arms & they have now scores of guns they got from the Reg'ts after they surrendered. I think they will be glad of them.

I am getting some better but not very well. Can sit up most all day but have very little appetite & no ambition. Hope my resignation will be accepted & I can get it in two weeks….We get new potatoes & beef & plenty of milk & eggs.

Yours as ever

Wm. M. Eames

William Mark Eames Papers

 

 

         19, The Cyprians' Progress

"The Frail Sisters." – The Cincinnati Gazette of the 17th says:" The Idahoecame up yesterday from Nashville, bringing a cargo of one hundred and fifty of the frail sisterhood of Nashville, who had bee sent North under military orders. Where does no seem to be much desire on the part of our authorities to welcome such a large addition o the already overflowing numbers engaged  in their peculiar profession, and the remonstrance were so urgent against their being permitted to land that the boat was taken over to the Kentucky shore; but the authorities of New port ad Covington have no greater desire for their company, and the consequence is that the poor girls are still kept on board the boar. It is said (on what authority we were unable to discover) that the military order issued in Nashville has been revoked in Washington, and that they will all be returned to Nashville again.

Nashville Daily Union, July 19, 1863.

         19, Cleveland prepares for reception of sick soldiers....

The town is full of soldiers getting the hospitals ready for the sick....

Diary of Myra Adelaide Inman, p. 197.

 

 

         19, Municipal justice in occupied Nashville

Recorder's Court. - There was no falling off in the business before the Recorder yesterday morning, and the court was occupied from 9 to 1 o'clock.

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, friends of Marshal Chumbley and the city Attorney, were charged with abusing Mrs. Mayan, an inmate of the house in which the defendants resided. Fined $5 and costs.

John Mayor was arraigned for tippling without a license. For want of proof he was discharged.

Marcus Combs, a negro [sic] was arrested for stealing whiskey from the firm of E. A. & T. C. Richards, and Church Jackson, another colored individual, was charged with receiving the stolen goods. One of the members of the firm found two bottles of whiskey on the person of Marcus, and defendant admitted that he had previously taken four bottles. According to the testimony, the proprietors had allowed him to sell liquor and had received money therefor. Judge Turner and M. M. Brien, jr., appeared for the defence, and defended their client ably – the Judge occupying the floor for over an hour. They submitted to the court whether the case could be considered larceny or not, as the evidenced did not sustain the charge of feloniously taking away of whisky [sic], but on the other hand, the testimony shows that he had been allowed the privilege of selling, and the prosecutor had received money from the sales effected. The Recorder required Marcus to give bond in the sum of $500 and appear before the next term of the Criminal Court, and no evidence appearing to sustain the charge against the other defendant, he was discharged.

Charles McAlister was required to answer the charge of stealing a hat from W. P. Campbell. Campbell testified that he was asleep in his hack about 12 o'clock on Monday night, and when he awoke, his hat was missing, and the next morning he found it in the possession of McAlister when he had him arrested. McAlister said in self-defence that a man named Daily had given him the hat. Committed to jail in default of $500 bail to appear before the next term of the Criminal Court.

G. H. Stubbs, a countryman, was found feeding his horses on the public square. Being in direct violation of corporation law, he was fined $5 and costs.

Ellen Stowe was arrested on a State warrant, charged with committing an assault and battery on Ada Wyatt, and a corporation warrant was also served on both for disorderly conduct. According to evidence, a fight occurred in the jungles between Ellen Stow and Ada Wyatt, one party being equally a guilty as the other. During the melee, Ada received a cut in the head from a slung shot, and was stabbed four times in the breast. The testimony throughout was disgusting, going to show the immorality and wretchedness of existing affairs in Smoky. On the State warrant, Ellen was fined $50, and $50 on the corporation warrant, and $5 was imposed on Ida Wyatt. Li M. Temple for the latter, and M. M. Brian for the former.

Mr. Burgen was accused of trespassing on the property of Peter Wells, or, in other words, running his hack into one belonging to Peter. The court considered it accidental, and discharged the defendant.

The last case before the court was a charge against the efficient Deputy Marshal, W. H. Wilkinson, and the Sunday policeman, John Frith, who had a little fight about a case presented on Monday morning. The Recorder required them to pony up each $5 and costs.

For drunkenness, Thomas Yates; G. W. Smith, John Williams, W. Grisham, and Wm. Wells, had the usual fine to settle.

Nashville Daily Press, July 20, 1864.

 


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX

 

         19, On the Memphis Vigilance Committee

A young man who has reached Cairo, after a perilous flight from Memphis, where4 he was imprisoned, and daily expected to hung for the crime of being a Northerner, tells the following among other incidents:-

"About one week after his confinement, the recorder of the city, I. M. Dickenson, sent for him, for the purpose, as he stated, 'of expressing his profound regret that it was not in his power to hang him' and from his seat in court he denounced him as 'a damned abolitionist, who should not be allowed to live an hour. Had I the power,' said the learned jurist, 'I would cut your ears off, and nail you to the door of my court-room, and probably I shall have the pleasure yet.' This is the man who has just been elected Justice of the fifth civil district of Memphis, one of the most important offices in the city."

He describes some of the outrages inflicted on Unionist in the following words:

"These indignities were of daily occurrences, and to some they went further, and indulged every species of cruelty-shaving the head and whipping being regarded as a slight punishment by any one who desired to remove North. Nor is this all. In more than fifty instances, during my confinement, men were taken before the Vigilance Committee, and no one knows what became of them. They never came from that building alive; and there are now more than that number confined there, of whom their friends will never hear again. Their acts are all secret, and there is no concern for the men charged with being tinctured with abolitionism, so that no one cares; and thus they go on in their wholesale murdering with impunity."

The Liberator, July 19, 1861. [1]

         19, Gratitude and praise for the Southern Mothers

To the Ladies of the Society of Southern Mothers:

Allow me to return to you my heartfelt thanks for your kind and unremitting attentions to the unfortunate men under my charge, who have been confined to your rooms by sickness, several of whom were snatched as it were from the very jaws of death, by their opportune arrival in this city, when another day in camp would, in all probability, have placed them beyond the reach of medicine or kind treatment; and I can assure you, now that they are about to depart, that they will ever remember your kindness; and although they may never see you again, nor be able to return to you or yours the compensation their grateful hearts would willingly offer, the moral influences will still be impressed upon them, and they will extend to such other unfortunates as may come in their way, the same kindnesses that they received from you. And thus, fair ladies, the germ planted and nourished by the Southern Mothers will grow into a vigorous plant, its branches reaching into the remotest parts of our beloved South, and thousand who never knew you will feel the blessings of this great work of charity, and the merited prayers of its many recipients will ascend to heaven and there be registered to the credit of you and yours for all time. I would also return to Dr. G. W. Curry the sincere thanks of all the soldiers in my charge for his kindness, and I congratulate you in being so fortunate in securing the services of one so thoroughly versed in medical science, and so well adapted to the difficult position he how holds.

Respectfully,

G. A. Hanson, 1st regiment Arkansas volunteers,

Col. Claiborne commanding, C. S. A.

Memphis Daily Appeal, July 19, 1861.

 

 

19, "Bless God – the Star Spangled Banner now waves over this rebellious town!" The letter of Surgeon William M. Eames to his wife in Ohio

Union Coll. Hospital

July 19, 1862

Dearest Mary,

Bless God – the Star Spangled Banner now waves over this rebellious town! and as I awoke this morning it seemed as tho, everything was bright and beautiful instead of dark & uncertain – as it has been every morning before this week.

Yesterday Gen. Nelson came into town with a Brigade & part of a battery, and I started down town on horseback – (for the first time in a week to see the old flag & our [sic] soldiers. I could hardly keep back the tears – when I first met them & felt that I was now among friends & safe. [sic] Every day before he had been annoyed and insulted more or less by soldiers & citizens who would come in with their guns & demand something or try to steal something. Was very much afraid they would get old Jim[2] - but by keeping him shut up close all the time – they did not find him but once. Then three of the scamps rode into the yard with their long rifles & rode directly to the stable & in a few minutes they had the poor horse out leading him away. Dr. French volunteered to go & talk with them (as I was nearly sick.) & he succeeded in getting him back & now I defy the whole race of such vagabonds. Many of the citizens are looking to me to protect them against the evils they see – in the coming of Gen. Nelson & I would gladly do it – but unfortunately I have but little influence with him. I am heartily glad he has come, for it is [sic] a nest of traitors as he said to me yesterday - & he can handle such fellows just right. If he stays here I think the citizens of Murfreesboro will wish they had Capt. Rounds & the cowards Lester back again. By the way both these worthies were obliged to foot it all the way to Woodbury & Capt. Rounds feet were very sore indeed & he was obliged to keep up at a double quick. [sic] He must have suffered severely for his efforts to please secessionists of this town. Col. Lester might have rode but did not get him a horse as they told him to do & when they came to start all the rest of the officers were mounted but he was on foot. He asked for a horse & they (the secesh told him it was too late - he might have got one when the rest die – but had to walk.) He is a most precious coward to surrender a whole Reg & Battery – with only 2 men killed and the enemy defeated as they acknowledged. They said repeatedly to our men that they should not have attacked them again. They could not get their men to face the cannon & were on the point of leaving. They had sent out all their prisoners & plunder etc. but concluded to try a little threatening & so the Rebel General write a not to Col. Lester telling him that if he did not surrender he would cut his Reg all to pieces & show him no quarter, & the infernal cowardly poltroon surrendered. We all feel the burning disgrace & humiliation.

Gen. Nelson asked Dr. Smith how many men we lost & he told him 23 & said with a big oath, "& you give up to the rebels after losing only 23."

I hope Lester will be tried by court martial for cowardice. His whole Reg will testify against him. The rebels must have burned 30,000 worth of U. S. property & carried off as much more. They begun [sic] to think that they had finished up the war & ruined Uncle Sam, so that he dare not come back to Murfreesboro at all, but they now find he is here & in a much worse fume than before Gen. N. has got hold of thousands of dollars worth of rebel citizens['] property already. Old Doct. January came up & wanted to get me to assist him in getting his nigger [sic] back & Dr. Basket wanted me to get his horse & buggy away etc. I don't pity them at all. I presume there will be another hunt for arms & they have now scores of guns they got from the Reg'ts after they surrendered. I think they will be glad of them.

I am getting some better but not very well. Can sit up most all day but have very little appetite & no ambition. Hope my resignation will be accepted & I can get it in two weeks….We get new potatoes & beef & plenty of milk & eggs.

Yours as ever

Wm. M. Eames

William Mark Eames Papers

 

 

         19, The Cyprians' Progress

"The Frail Sisters." – The Cincinnati Gazette of the 17th says:" The Idahoe came up yesterday from Nashville, bringing a cargo of one hundred and fifty of the frail sisterhood of Nashville, who had bee sent North under military orders. Where does no seem to be much desire on the part of our authorities to welcome such a large addition o the already overflowing numbers engaged  in their peculiar profession, and the remonstrance were so urgent against their being permitted to land that the boat was taken over to the Kentucky shore; but the authorities of New port ad Covington have no greater desire for their company, and the consequence is that the poor girls are still kept on board the boar. It is said (on what authority we were unable to discover) that the military order issued in Nashville has been revoked in Washington, and that they will all be returned to Nashville again.

Nashville Daily Union, July 19, 1863.

         19, Cleveland prepares for reception of sick soldiers....

The town is full of soldiers getting the hospitals ready for the sick....

Diary of Myra Adelaide Inman, p. 197.

 

 

         19, Municipal justice in occupied Nashville

Recorder's Court. - There was no falling off in the business before the Recorder yesterday morning, and the court was occupied from 9 to 1 o'clock.

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, friends of Marshal Chumbley and the city Attorney, were charged with abusing Mrs. Mayan, an inmate of the house in which the defendants resided. Fined $5 and costs.

John Mayor was arraigned for tippling without a license. For want of proof he was discharged.

Marcus Combs, a negro [sic] was arrested for stealing whiskey from the firm of E. A. & T. C. Richards, and Church Jackson, another colored individual, was charged with receiving the stolen goods. One of the members of the firm found two bottles of whiskey on the person of Marcus, and defendant admitted that he had previously taken four bottles. According to the testimony, the proprietors had allowed him to sell liquor and had received money therefor. Judge Turner and M. M. Brien, jr., appeared for the defence, and defended their client ably – the Judge occupying the floor for over an hour. They submitted to the court whether the case could be considered larceny or not, as the evidenced did not sustain the charge of feloniously taking away of whisky [sic], but on the other hand, the testimony shows that he had been allowed the privilege of selling, and the prosecutor had received money from the sales effected. The Recorder required Marcus to give bond in the sum of $500 and appear before the next term of the Criminal Court, and no evidence appearing to sustain the charge against the other defendant, he was discharged.

Charles McAlister was required to answer the charge of stealing a hat from W. P. Campbell. Campbell testified that he was asleep in his hack about 12 o'clock on Monday night, and when he awoke, his hat was missing, and the next morning he found it in the possession of McAlister when he had him arrested. McAlister said in self-defence that a man named Daily had given him the hat. Committed to jail in default of $500 bail to appear before the next term of the Criminal Court.

G. H. Stubbs, a countryman, was found feeding his horses on the public square. Being in direct violation of corporation law, he was fined $5 and costs.

Ellen Stowe was arrested on a State warrant, charged with committing an assault and battery on Ada Wyatt, and a corporation warrant was also served on both for disorderly conduct. According to evidence, a fight occurred in the jungles between Ellen Stow and Ada Wyatt, one party being equally a guilty as the other. During the melee, Ada received a cut in the head from a slung shot, and was stabbed four times in the breast. The testimony throughout was disgusting, going to show the immorality and wretchedness of existing affairs in Smoky. On the State warrant, Ellen was fined $50, and $50 on the corporation warrant, and $5 was imposed on Ida Wyatt. Li M. Temple for the latter, and M. M. Brian for the former.

Mr. Burgen was accused of trespassing on the property of Peter Wells, or, in other words, running his hack into one belonging to Peter. The court considered it accidental, and discharged the defendant.

The last case before the court was a charge against the efficient Deputy Marshal, W. H. Wilkinson, and the Sunday policeman, John Frith, who had a little fight about a case presented on Monday morning. The Recorder required them to pony up each $5 and costs.

For drunkenness, Thomas Yates; G. W. Smith, John Williams, W. Grisham, and Wm. Wells, had the usual fine to settle.

Nashville Daily Press, July 20, 1864.

 



[1] GALEGROUP - TSLA 19TH CN

[2] A slave hired by Eames to undertake hospital duties.


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX

 

Friday, July 18, 2014

 

        18, Editorial anxieties in Memphis about food supply and clothing for Tennessee's soldiers

We desire to call the attention of planters to the importance of an early subscription in flour and corn-meal for the use of our army. The Confederate Government purchased in May last an immense quantity of flour, and stored it as this place, but the supply is now nearly exhausted. Unless the planters of West Tennessee, North Alabama, and Mississippi, come forward and subscribe flour and meal, taking Confederate bonds in payment, our brave boys in the field will soon be without bread. Let each planter indicate to the Commissary Department at this place, by mail or through his commission merchant, what quantity he is willing to sell to the Government for their bonds, and let them send it forward immediately. There are five mills in operation here capable of grinding _____ [sic] bushels daily, to which the planters can send their bushels daily, to which the planters can send their wheat and have it ground and barreled, ready for transportation. The near approach of the autumnal season, and the almost certainty of the continuance of the war, suggest not only the propriety but the necessity of supplying our troops in the field with warm clothing and warm covering. It will not probably be within the power of the Government to do this, and much necessarily depends upon individual effort. On this subject the following suggestions of the West Tennessee Whig are the most feasible and practicable we have seen:-

The supply of blankets in store is exhausted, and the possibility of supply from the North is cut off by the rigid non-intercourse of the war, while the blockading of our seaports cuts us off from all hopes of a reasonable supply by importation. How, then, it may be asked, are the wants of our soldiers to be supplies: It can only be done by every family giving up a portion of the blankets they have for family use, to the soldiers, and supplying the deficiency thus created by making "comforts" out of cotton for their own use. These comforts do well enough for persons in comfortable houses at home when they are not exposed to the weather, and our people are expected to make use of them, and send their blankets to the soldiers. There is no time to be lost in doing it either. Before many are aware of it, the cool nights of early autumn will be upon them, and what they do for the comfort of the soldiers, they must do quickly.

Memphis Appeal, July 18, 1861.[1]

 

 

        18, Re-establishment of the Federal presence in Murfreesboro, the account of Kate Carney

I sometimes find myself writing before breakfast. No prospect of a fight. The day is clear & beautiful. Ma & Cousin Ann went up town this morning. Most everyone is very much frightened. Aunt Nancy Avent & Cousin Tabitha Morgan sent a good many of their things out here, expecting the town to be burned. The Yankees came in town just before dinner & stopped all traveling, even on the streets. Ma started the servant twice, but they didn't succeed in getting Pa's dinner to him. Ephe came out & said they were searching everybody's house for brooms & guns. Can't imagine what they want with brooms. They are concentrating their troops around the square, and as they are very wet (having rained quite hard), probably they want to exercise to keep from taking cold, or may be to keep us from cleaning up our boys any more. We saw about 12 or 14 coming, & I thought they were going to search our house too, so placed my little Southern flag in my bosom, for I had made it hoping to wave it at our dear boys as they would pass by. I hid Helen's flag also in the same place, a box of powder, & a number of union envelopes that I had as trophies. Marched up as if the place belonged to them, rung the bell with quite an air. Said they came to get horses & wagons. Ma said they should not have hers, that she would see Gen. Nelson about it. The officer said very impertinently come on boy's, we will go and see what she has got, & take them. Bettie & I heard them from our window [and] rushed downstairs into the yard, & went to where the horses were & gave them a piece of my mind. Rebuked them for running at Shiloh, Richmond, Bull's Run, &c., &c. he put on quite a bold air first but cooled down considerable before I got through. Bettie then came forward and gave them another cutting speech. Some of the privates enjoyed the way we treated the officer. One told me to ask him about running at Pittsburgh Landing. I really believe that although they were all in Yankee blue, some of them were good Southern men. One said he wished all my brothers might get home safely. That he never intended to kill our boys, if he could help it. They seem to have quite a contempt for that egotistical officer they had with them. They finally said, if we would lend the cart and one horse they would pledge their word it should be brought back. To our surprise it came back in an hour's time, all right. Ma had the buggy gotten up and went after Pa, as they would not let him come out home. They had several citizens arrested. Everybody advised her not to attempt going up in town but she did, saw one of the Officers and got Pa a permit to return home. Old Bill Spence, Ashburn, & Ned Jordan came in with the army. The citizens may expect a gay time now, as they are grand scoundrels. I wish I had known where old Ashburn was hid, I should have told on him. The Reeves, I understand, have been up since 5 o'clock, cheering the Yankees on. They ought to be run out of town after falling as low as they have. Mrs. Anderson & her sister Kate have not yet left town. Mrs. Lain was over here a few moments this evening.

Kate Carney Diary.

 

 

        18, Rules governing the acceptance of juveniles as Confederate conscript substitutes

MINORS-WHO CAN BE SUBSTITUTES AND THE OBLIGATIONS OF THE PRINCIPLES.

Minors.- there may be enlisted, with consent of parents or guardians.

If they have been enlisted without such consent, their parents may proceed on application, with permission duly authorized by oath, to the Adjutant and Inspector General at Richmond.

If they are in service with such consent, as substitutes, the substitution is good until the minor arrives at the age of eighteen. He thus becomes liable in his own person, and the liability at the principal services. All such substitutions were good previous to September 8th, 1862-not since.

Minors by a recent law, are eligible to hold any commission or exaction that an officer required by law to be bonded.

2. Substitutes-An eligible substitute must be without the limits of conscript age, a citizen, and of good moral character. He can only be received at a conscript camp of instruction, or in a company with the consent of the company and regimental commanders.

The acceptance of a substitute is conditional. If, by any existing of subsequent law; the class [to which he belongs?] becomes subsequently liable to service, the liability of the principal revives.

Paid agents often do not scruple to furnish, on the signature of the ignorant or reckless officers, substitution papers that are not valid. The public is warned against all such.

Knoxville Daily Southern Chronicle, July 18, 1863.

        18, Confederate Provost Marshals in East Tennessee ordered to cease violations of citizens' liberties

GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 82.

Headquarters, Department East Tenn.

Knoxville, July 18, 1863

1. The Major General Commanding finds it necessary to call the attention of Provost Marshal, and all other officers, to the following points:

1st. Every citizen must be secured against arrest by the Military authorities, except when there is evident reason to believe that he has been guilty of a violation of law.

2nd. The custom, which it too frequent, of making arrests without proper evidence must be discontinued. The careful investigation of a number of cases show that there are number of instances where the officers making the arrest have not proceeded with due caution. The Major General Commanding will not entertain charges based merely upon suspicion of disloyalty to the Government.-It is to be presumed that every citizen who pursues his ordinary avocation, and does nothing which tends to disturb the public peace, is a law-abiding citizen, and as such is entitled to the protection of the government.

3d. Every officer making an arrest will forward with the prisoner specific charges, which shall set forth the cause of the arrest, and the facts of which the party shall have been guilty, together with the testimony which will establish the charges, and will be necessary to the investigations of the case.

4th. Every officer who directs an arrest will be held accountable that it is not made without probable cause.

5th. While every law abiding person must be protected in the enjoyment of his civil rights, there are other classes of persons against whom all the severities of the law will be visited. 1. That class of persons, the outlaws of society, and real enemies of the human race, usually denominated "Bushwhackers." They are in arms against the authority of any law or society. All such persons must be pursued and no quarter shown to any as long as they; offer resistance-but no unarmed man must be shot down. 2. That class of persons who hold secret communication of any kind with the enemies of our country, or who by open advocacy of their government in opposition to the Confederate Government, show their adherence to the government with which we are at War, must be regarded in the light of enemies in our midst and are liable to arrest by the military authorities or any specific offences with which they may be charged.

By command of

Maj. Gen. BUCKNER

Knoxville Daily Southern Chronicle, July 24, 1863.

 

 

        19, Federals burn much of Fairmont[2] as reprisal for native support for guerrillas; excerpt from a Confederate woman's diary

* * * *

....20 Yankees rode up on the 19th of July and picketed their horses all around our piazza. She [Bettie] was lying on the ottoman, but got up and sat in the door and we entered into conversation with them about the horses-one of them dressed in Confederate uniform, looked sulky, but offered to sell me his horse for 75 dollars-they were packing waggons [sic] they said to take Tilfords [a neighbor] whiskey off-our dinner came on and Bettie invited one of them (a small fellow that talked to us about his mother) to come in and take some dinner. He came in and I told him if he had a particular friend to bring him in-I had enough dinner for more of them-He brought in a Soldier named Emmerson of Wisconsin-they dined and thanked me-in a short time all mounted-but first dismissed the 5 waggons [sic] that were on the squared at their command. Wilson [,] the one dressed in grey clothes rode up and told me I was reported at headquarters by one of my neighbors and one of my negroes [sic] as harboring guerillas [sic]-of course I denied it-told him I never saw one in my life that I knew. He remarked you know the penalty is burning your house-they then made off to Tilford's still house. I felt uneasy and began to move out my clothes, but Bettie and Mrs. Jones laughed at, and discouraged me. I had my wearing clothes taken out of the house, & gave some valuables to a neighbor to keep for me. We passed the evening, had an early supper-and had just finished eating and walked in the piazza when Bettie said [:"]Mama [,] look on the hill at the Yankees coming[!"] they galloped by and one cried out ["]You had better be taking things out[!"]-they broke down the store broke up the shelves-turned over the counter-I rushed into the street-went to the officer, begged and implored he would [sic] spare the house, it belonged to a poor man, to go on the hull and burn...[burn my own houses] [sic]-No[,] the demon would not stay his hand-I rushed back and commenced taking things. I saw dear Bettie-told her to go and take care of herself and then rushed off to save what I could-just then Emmerson-the Yankee soldier stepped in behind me, and said, ["]I eat [sic] with you today Madam, and I have come to help you, and he did help me faithfully and long as we could stay in the building-others came in and helped a little and stole a great deal. My negroes [sic] were saving their own things until the fire was too far advanced-when Wilson, the wretch, came in with the torch I met and asked him not [to] set the house on fire until I had some of my things, he replied ["]I am in a hurry and won't wait more than 5 minutes["]-I held a candle to be lighted (it was dark)[.] We both blew at it, with our heads in 4 inches of each other, he then walked to the mantel piece, tore up the screen, set it against the mantle, took Bettie's music, stuck it on and set fire to it-the mantle soon caught; Eliza told me a Yankee had told her he would shoot her if she went upstairs after anything-I told her to send Hardin to me, took up a bucket of water and dashed it on the mantle and put out the blaze, rushed up stairs and saved a bed and mattress and threw many things out of the window, but just as I entered the door to go up a Yankee rode rapidly to the street and shot at me as I entered the opposite side. I heard it but it made so little impression on me that I leaped on up the stairs-and the coward galloped back fearing, I suppose that he had shot me, and [was] afraid of being identified. Well this is a faint outline of the work of that night-Women were praying to the demons, children crying, men looked appalled. They threatened to burn the whole town-but finally were satisfied with burning one block of buildings. All this time I thought Bettie was at Mr. Jones-and after the whole blocked was wrapped in one sheet of flames, I went over to Mr. Jones and looked for Bettie-she was not there-someone said she was at Dr. Robertson's. I could not send [anyone] to Pickets were thrown out and they threatened to shoot everyone that passed. I rested content tho [sic] that she was safe. The next morning I went over to my garden where all my beds and clothes were thrown, there were 2 Yankees around and one was dirty and had his sleeves rolled up. I did not speak, but passed him in silence-After breakfast Mrs. Jones came out and with her my poor frail child looking [at] the picture of despair. ["]O, Mamma [sic] ["] she said[,] ["]we are in Hell-O, no, my child, we are on the beautiful earth, but there are demons that surround us [!"]-I labored all day. My neighbors were very kind-assisted me to take care of the remnant of my things-As soon as I could enquire I found that Bettie had taken up an arm full of clothes, two carpet bags-a fine painting and put her hat on and started [illegible] from the burning building-she made her way to R. Jones over 5 fences-would get up and fall of, of each [sic] fence-fell 3 times in the cotton field and was taken with Diarreah [sic]. [sic] She had a vial of Paregoric [sic] which she drank-at length with the assistance of a blind little negro she got to Mr. J. [sic] yard fence and when taken in had to be rubbed to restore animation-She was never very well again-Mr. Johns took her home with him-I went over most every night, and how her affectionate heart mourned over my situation-but God sustained me thro' [sic] it all.

Journal of Bettie Ridley Blackmore[3]

 

 

 



[1] As cited in Rebellion Record, Vol. 3, p. 31. Given such shortages this early in the war,  it is difficult to know how the Confederate army managed to fight for as long as it did.

[2] There is no mention of this action in the OR or Dyer's Battle Index for Tennessee.

[3] Journal of Bettie Ridley Blackmore, pp. 74-75. This selection was written by Rebeccah [sic] C. Ridley, mother of Bettie Ridley Blackmore who was during this incident ill, and would in the future die of tuberculosis.


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014

7.17. 14 Tennessee Civil War Notes

        17, General Orders, No. 75, relative to free Negroes and Mulattos in Memphis

Headquarters, District of Memphis

Memphis, Tenn. July 17, 1863

I. All idlers, vagrants and persons without lawful occupation or means of support, found within the District of Memphis after ten days from this date, will be arrested and confined at hard labor in Fort Pickering.

II. All owners of slaves within the District of Memphis must, within twenty days, report to the District Provost Marshal the names, age, and description of such slaves.

III. Every free negro [sic] or mulatto, and every contraband within the District must, with[in] twenty days enter into the employment of some responsible white person, who will be required to report names, age, and description of such from negroes [sic] or contrabands and nature of contract, to the Provost Marshal of the District.

IV. All negroes [sic] and mulattos failing to find service or employment with some responsible white person, will immediately remove to the contraband camp, under charge of Chaplain Fiske, Superintendent of contrabands.

By order of Brig. Gen. James C. Veatch

Memphis Bulletin, August 16, 1863.

        17, Governor Isham G. Harris's last proclamation to Confederates in Tennessee[1]

To the People of Tennessee!

The Constitution Tennessee requires the qualified voters of the State to elect a Governor, members of the General Assembly, and representatives in Congress, on the first Thursday in August next.

This duty can be performed with proper effort on your part, regardless of the attempt of arbitrary and lawless power to prevent it.

There is scarcely a county in the State where a large number of citizens may not assemble at some precinct, and cast their votes for Governor, one congressman from each Congressional district, and Senator and Representative in the State Legislature. It is vitally important that you do so, and in doing so that you act with perfect harmony, casting the whole vote for some good and true man, for each position some man who is already outside of the enemy's lines or who will immediately come out to avoid arrest.

The importance of perpetuating your State Government through the regular constitutional channels is too apparent to require argument. I need only suggest to you the means of holding the election and making the proper returns.

There will be a military force in your county on the first Thursday in August to protect you in holding the election, and by which you can send out the returns.

This law puts it in the power of any three freeholders to pen and hold the election, if there is no officer present, whose duty it is to do so.

You will seal up the returns in the Governor's election and direct them to the Speaker of the Senate at Athens, Tenn.,

The other returns you will seal up and direct to the Secretary of State at Athens, Tenn.

The failure to return copies of poll books to the courts of your respective counties does not vitiate the election within the Federal lines. Where it may involve parties participating in the election, the poll-books need not be returned to the courts.

You will send the returns to the Secretary of State by the military force which will be in you county on the day of the election, or by the members of the Legislature elect, or such other mode as you may see proper to adopt.

Isham G. Harris, Governor of Tennessee

Chattanooga, July 17, 1863

Memphis Bulletin, October 1, 1863.

 

 

        17, "Accidental Death"

Mary Dickey, a white woman, about 60 or 65 years of age, was found dead in her bed yesterday morning, under a tree in McGavock's addition, near the residence of the late Gen. [sic] A. Heiman. Having no house to live in, she had her bed and other household articles removed to this place, a few days ago, where she camped for the time being, and until she could procure a place of shelter. P.B. Coleman, Esq., the Coroner, was informed of her death, and repaired with his usual promptness to the place, where he summoned a Jury, consisting of P. G. Warren, J.B. Ruddick, John Haslam, John S. Love, B.H. Brown, A.B. Williams and J. Norman, who proceeded to hold an inquest. The facts elicited upon the examination are substantially as follows: It appears that on the night of the 19th instant, at about 10 o'clock, a party of five or six marauders attempted to break into the stable of Mr. Joshua Norman. Mr. Norman and several friends who were with him in the house, hearing them, went into the yard and commenced firing on the party. The marauders returned the fire, shooting six times, about the same number of shots being fired by Mr. N. [sic] and his friends. It was therefore the opinion of the jury that Mrs. Dickey came to her death by a stray shot fired by one of the party who were present for the purpose of committing a robbery and the jury rendered a verdict accordingly. Mrs. Dickey was shot in the heart, the ball lodging in the right shoulder. The deceased was well known in the neighborhood.

In this connection we will remark that the neighborhood in which this melancholy affair took place is invested with a party of thieves, and house-breaking and robbing is of nightly occurrence.[added] In chronicling the above, what will be thought by the distant reader of our once fair city? An old woman turned out of her lowly cabin, and compelled to seek shelter under a tree, and meets her death by a band of thieves and midnight assassins, who prowl about in our streets! Let us drop the curtain on this demoralized state of affairs, and hope for something better in the future.

Nashville Daily Press, July 18, 1864.

        17, "A Negro Elopes with Another Man's Wife-Bloody Affair-Fatal Termination."

About two o'clock, yesterday evening, an altercation took place between two negroes [sic] named Daniel Ewing and Ned McIntosh, in the alley running from Vine and Spruce street, and midway between Cedar and High streets. After a short quarrel, Ewing drew a butcher knife and commenced an assault upon McIntosh, inflicting a serious wound on his antagonist, in the back of his neck.

After being cut, McIntosh succeeded in wrenching the knife from the hands of Ewing, making a "rake" at his opponent's neck, he cut his jugular vein, from the effects of which Ewing died almost instantly. The jury, consisting of J. E. Newman, E P Fort, Wm. Shriver, Tobe Burk, Thomas Ryan, Lawrence Gallagher and Edward Williamson, returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts, and gave as their opinion that the act was one of justifiable homicide.

The cause of the difficulty was ascertained to be as follows: Ewing, several days ago, went to the house of McIntosh and succeeded in persuading his wife and children to leave her bed and board and follow him. The injured husband went to the house of the gay deceiver on Saturday last and endeavored to procure his children in which he failed. He doubtless was on the same mission yesterday, when the difficulty occurred. Ewing received what he deserved. The wound of McIntosh is a serious one, but is not considered dangerous.

Nashville Daily Press, July 18, 1864.

 

 

        17, "A Jolly Party."

Several members of the city government, and a number of military officers and others, went on Sunday morning on a visit to the elegant mansion and plantation of Messrs. Copeland & Baker, near the Dickerson Pike, about a mile and a quarter from Edgefield. They were about twenty in the party, whose conveyance there and back consisted of two ambulances and two buggies. Arriving at the spot about 12 M., the party smiled to their "worthy hosts," again "to the day, and many returns of the same," and again "here's to you all, boys," when they strolled over the beautiful grounds, admired the vegetables, the fruit, and the balmy air, but more than all the cool grove into which they step, and seat themselves with all the ease and dignity becoming the occasion and the heat of the day. Ice in abundance soon appeared, and Mayor Smith proposed some ice-water; Sayers thought they were too warm Puckett tried it, but failed, when Hinton requested him to stand aside. Capt. Clark suggested a dash of whisky, to which all were about to say amen, when Copeland appeared in the distance, two stalwart negroes [sic] bearing a washtub, in which were buried in ice, certain mysterious long-necked bottles. Pop! goes the cork, and the sparkling liquid rushes into the glasses charged with ice, and glides smoothly down the throat of "The Corporation of Nashville" and its friends. How delicious the beverage! Pop! goes another, and Pop! goes a third, but still the thirsty souls pant for more, until the last of the dozen bottles have gone to that bourne, etc., when the dinner bell rings. We will not attempt to describe the table, groaning under the weight of good things it bore. Maj. Gunkle paid it a merited compliment, Chumbly thought it capital, the City Attorney thought it the best case he had had for many a day, to which Squire Wilkinson echoed "Oh! yes! oh! yes!" and was about to adjourn "this honorable court," when another washtub of champagne appeared on the carpet. At sight of the second dozen Myers thought he could out-wrestle any one in the crowd, but "old man Howe" took the starch out of him, and settled it down with an extra bottle. The last we saw of the party Davy Henderson was piloting one of the teams over the bridge about 5 ½ P. M., with Dodd Bringing up the rear.

Nashville Dispatch, July 17, 1864.

        17, "Love and Murder."

Several days ago, Daniel Ewing succeeded in seducing from the path of rectitude, and the bed and board of her husband, the wife of Ned. Macintosh, at which Ned became highly incensed, and went to the house of the "diabolyacal [sic] villain" on Saturday [16th] to demand the satisfaction due from the sable gentleman to an injured husband and father. In this mission Ned failed, but determined to do or die, Ned went again on Saturday afternoon, about two o'clock and found Dan in the alley running from Vine and Spruce streets, and midway between Cedar and Union streets. After a stout quarrel, Ewing drew a butcher knife and commenced an assault upon McIntosh, inflicting a serious wound on his antagonist on the back of the neck. After being cut McIntosh succeeded in wrenching the knife from the hands of Ewing, and making a "rake" at his opponent's neck, he cut his jugular vein, from the effects of which Ewing died almost instantly. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts, and gave as their opinion that the act was one of the justifiable homicide. Ewing received what he deserved. The wound of McIntosh is a serious one, but is not considered dangerous.

Nashville Dispatch, July 17, 1864.

        17, "Negro Hospital."

That indefatigable officer, Capt. Chas. H. Irvin, ever mindful of those in his employ, will on Monday commence the erection of a hospital for his sable employees. The Captain has selected a suitable site, and the hospital will be built with an eye to everything conducive to good health. We may say here that neither the Irvin Hospital, we described last Sunday, not the one about to be commenced, will cost the Government one dollar. They belong to Capt. Irvin and his employees.

Nashville Dispatch, July 17, 1864.

 

 

        17, President Andrew Johnson expresses wishes concerning execution of laws in Tennessee

STATE OF TENNESSEE, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Nashville, Tenn., July 17, 1865.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. Army:

GEN.: I have the honor to furnish for your information the following copy of telegram:

WASHINGTON, July 16, 1865--3.50 p. m.

Governor W. G. BROWNLOW:

I hope, as I have no doubt, you will see that the laws passed by the last Legislature are faithfully executed, and that all illegal voters in the approaching election be kept from the polls, and that the election of Members of Congress be conducted fairly. Whenever it becomes necessary for the execution of the law and the protection of the ballot-box, you will call upon Gen. Thomas for sufficient military force to sustain the civil authority of the State. I have just read your address, which I most heartily indorse.

ANDREW JOHNSON, President of the United States.

OR, Ser. I, Vol. 49, pt. II, p. 1083



[1] That this was indeed Harris' last proclamation is mute, but it may well be the final proclamation he made in Tennessee.


James B. Jones, Jr.

Public Historian

Tennessee Historical Commission

2941 Lebanon Road

Nashville, TN  37214

(615)-770-1090 ext. 123456

(615)-532-1549  FAX